Money and Championships (NFL and NHL)

Posted: 05/23/2012 by levcohen in Football, Hockey

continued post from the other day.

NFL:

2007-8: New York Giants beat New England Patriots
Giants payroll: 75.5 million, 32nd (last) in NFL. Patriots payroll: 118 million, 2nd in NFL
Worst NFL team in 2007-8 season: Miami Dolphins, Payroll: 92.5 million, 28th in NFL

2008-9: Pittsburgh Steelers beat Arizona Cardinals
Steelers payroll: 129 million, 6th in NFL. Cardinals payroll: 122 million, 8th in NFL
Worst NFL team in 2008-9: Detroit Lions, payroll: 96 million, 26th in NFL

2009-10: New Orleans Saints beat Indianapolis Colts
Saints payroll: 121.5 million, 4th in NFL. Colts payroll: 103.5 million, 19th in NFL
Worst NFL team in 2009-10:  St. Louis Rams, payroll: 99.5 million, 24th in NFL

2010-11: Green Bay Packers beat Pittsburgh Steelers
Packers payroll: 135.5 million, 7th in NFL. Steelers payroll: 123 million, 18th in NFL
Worst NFL team in 2010-11: Carolina Panthers, payroll: 111 million, 22nd in NFL

2011-12: New York Giants beat New England Patriots
Giants payroll: 118.5 million, 12th in NFL. Patriots payroll: 113 million, 19th in NFL
Worst NFL team in 2011-12: Indianapolis Colts, payroll: 114 million, 17th in NFL

Conclusion: The superbowl winner has averaged the 12th best payroll, a number that was driven up insanely by the Giants last place payroll in 2007-08. If I was to take that out, the winner would have averaged the 7th best payroll. The superbowl runner up has had the 13th best payroll on average. The worst NFL team has averaged the 24th best payroll. Overall, the NFL can be won by a team with a big payroll or a small one,  more so than in the MLB and NBA.

NHL:

2006-7: Anehiem Ducks over Ottawa Senators
Ducks payroll:  40.5 million, 15th in NHL. Senators payroll: 43.5 million, 7th in NHL
Worst NHL team in 2006-7: Philadelphia Flyers, payroll: 44 million, 5th in NHL

2007-8: Detroit Red Wings over Pittsburgh Penguins
Red Wings payroll:  44.5 million, 16th in NHL. Penguins payroll: 41.5 million, 20th in NHL
Worst NHL team in 2007-8: Tampa Bay Lightning, payroll: 39 million, 25th in NHL

2008-9: Pittsburgh Penguins over Detroit Red Wings
Penguins payroll: 56.5 million, 7th in NHL. Red Wings payroll: 56.5 million, 8th in NHL.
Worst NHL team in 2008-9: NY Islanders, payroll: 33 million, 30th (last) in NHL

2009-10: Chicago Blackhawks over Philadelphia Flyers
Blackhawks payroll: 61 million, 4th in NHL. Flyers payroll: 58 million, 7th in NHL.
Worst NHL team in 2009-10: Edmonton Oilers, payroll: 51 million, 18th in NHL.

2010-11: Boston Bruins over Vancouver Canucks
Bruins payroll: 65 million, 5th in NHL. Canucks payroll: 71 million, 1st in NHL.
Worst NHL team in 2010-11: Edmonton Oilers, payroll: 45.5 million, 25th in NHL

Conclusion: The Stanley Cup winner has an average of the 9th highest payroll in the NHL. The runner up has a similar payroll, but just a little higher(8.6). The worst team in the NHL has a payroll of 21st in the NHL on average. In the first two years, all 3 teams had almost identical combined payrolls. However, as the top teams decided to spend more, the gap widened. In the last three years, the cup winner and the runner up both have an overall 16th payroll finish, making 5 and a third on average. In that time, the league’s worst team has had their payroll’s finish up around 24th.

 

 

FINAL Analyses:

Let’s take a look at all the numbers together:

MLB: 6th (winner), 20th (runner up), 22nd (last)

NBA: 5th, 14th, 18th

NFL: 12th, 13th, 24th

NHL: 9th, 9th, 21st

it is clear that while money doesn’t buy championships, it definitely helps teams win them.

Final standings (in order of in which sports it is easiest to buy championships). This is just by the numbers:

1. NBA
2. NHL
3. MLB
4. NFL

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Comments
  1. marinite says:

    This isn’t investment advice, is it?

  2. philabundant says:

    Notice that the more players on the field/floor/ice at one time, the less likely money caan equal success, which is completely logical.

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